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Thursday, January 8, 2015

March from Selma Changed History and Still Does Says Marcher David Randolph as Film Opens Widely

John Lewis and David Randolph in San Raphael, CA on August 2nd, 2009, International Forgiveness Day
ALBANY, Calif., Jan. 8, 2015 /Christian Newswire/ -- The film "Selma" makes visible the march that changed history and continues today, according to David James Randolph who marched in Selma on "Turnaround Tuesday." Randolph met with John Lewis more recently to thank him for his leadership and renew their commitment to march on in the great parade for love and justice.

Lewis and Randolph are "two thumbs up" on the film. Both men independently praise its fidelity to the event and relevance to the present. Both affirm the quality of interaction between Dr. King and President Johnson as positive. Randolph returned to his teaching at Drew University where he led the faculty of the school of theology to send a delegation to Montgomery for the conclusion of the march that had far reaching effects on theological education at Drew and beyond.

Randolph details his experience in his book "The Great Parade: Life, Love, Work:"

"Lessons learned then (in Selma) have meaning now. In the face of overpowering odds the action of a committed minority can transform society. Religious leaders can provide the spiritual and moral foundations for action while religious and educational institutions can inform and mobilize people. Media can draw attention to injustice and bring pressure for change. The President of the United States can use his 'bully pulpit' as did Lyndon Johnson. Legislators can pass better laws, courts justly interpret them and police humanely enforce them. Ordinary people can do extraordinary things when called upon by true leaders.

"As we face new challenges it's good to know that history is transformed not only in shining events when the victors enter the city but also in those shadowy moments when people commit themselves to the Cause whatever the outcome."

On Sunday, January 18th, events planned to renew the Selma spirit include a reading hosted by David Madgalene, editor of "World of Change," an anthology of poetry showing the relevance of the civil rights movement of the '60s today. Jym Marks contributed "I'm Not As Black As You Think I Am" and Julio Rodriguez calls for the community and the police to work together in "Dear Badge Man." Other local presenters at the Healdsburg California Literary Salon include Vilma Ginzberg.


"The Great Parade" and "World of Change" are published by New Way Media and available from Amazon.com.

David Randolph writes:

“I first crossed paths with John Lewis when he spoke at the March on Washington in 1963 and again in Selma in 1965. When we met in California in 2009 it was to give thanks for the march thus far and to commit ourselves to march on in God's Great Parade for love and justice for all.  
 The March on Washington in 1963 was the outward and visible sign of the inner and spiritual transformation, which would change the world through one of history's greatest events. This leads to the March from Washington which for me meant back home to New Jersey and to jail in Jackson Mississippi in 1964 and the Bridge in Selma Alabama in 1965 with the landmark legislation which continued to change the world until June 25, 2013 when it was nullified in effect by the Supreme Court.  The greatness of the March on Washington in 1963 is that it symbolizes the universal quest for freedom while embodying the specific accomplishments of an objective historical event and movement for individuals and society.

         Back on the bus afterwards in conversation with Drew University colleague John Godsey and others, we agreed that Dr. Martin Luther King’s dream speech summed up the day. I was not surprised by this but by the over-whelming spectacle of the event, especially the music of Joan Baez, Bob Dylan, Peter, Paul and Mary and Mahalia Jackson that lifted us so high. To his day I can hear the voice of Joan Baez soaring like the soul above he crowd. Suddenly those of us who can do so little alone believe we can do everything together, and a consciousness begins to form that we can change he world. The torch of Pres. Kennedy is passed to a new generation of Americans. Here is a new frontier and we are on it.
All this coalesces in an invisible energy supply, which will fuel us as we go back home and beyond. Lessons learned then have meaning now. In the face of overpowering odds the action of a committed minority can transform society. Religious leaders can provide the spiritual and moral foundations for action while religious and educational institutions can inform and mobilize people. Media can draw attention to injustice and bring pressure for change. The President of the United States can use his “bully pulpit” as did John Kennedy and Lyndon Johnson. Legislators can pass better laws, courts justly interpret them and police humanely enforce them. Ordinary people can do extraordinary things when called upon by true leaders. As we face new challenges it is good to know that history is transformed not only in those shining events when the victors enter the city but also in those shadowy moments when people commit themselves to the Cause whatever the outcome.”(The above is an excerpt from “The Great Parade: Life, Love, Work” by David James Randolph available from Amazon.com)

This from the Healdsburg Literary Guild:

In another not-to-be-missed program, the Healdsburg Literary 
Guild's  Third Sunday Salon presents poet/anthologist David 
Madgalene and five poets from his latest publication, World of 
Change.

Join us on Sunday, January 18, 2015, from 1:30 to 3:30 PM, 
at the Bean Affair, 1270 Healdsburg Avenue.

This unique anthology includes not only the poems of 63 area 
poets addressing changes they would like to see in our world, 
but also their short essays on their reasons for writing the 
poems.

Poets reading at this event, in addition to Madgalene, include 
David Beckman, Vilma Ginzberg, Jim Miller, Margo Van Veen, 
and Gor Yaswen. 

Don’t miss what promises to be a powerful and thought-
provoking afternoon!

FREE and open to the public  

Raffle and book sales

Open mic [3-minute limit, sign-ups begin at 1:00 PM]

As usual, the presentation will be followed by open mic time [3-
minute limit] for writers to present examples of their own work, in 
this now 16th year of the Healdsburg Literary Guild’s Third 
Sunday Salon, the longest continuously-running literary venue 
in Sonoma County.

web site: www.hbglitguild.org

Facebook: www.facebook.com/HealdsburgLiteraryGuild


Check out our YouTube channel to see if your reading at our 
recent  events is there! Scroll freely, there are many readings!

The Third Sunday Salon, an ongoing program of the non-profit 
Healdsburg Literary Guild, meets the third Sunday of each month 
and  includes an open mic after featured literary presenters.

Tuesday, November 18, 2014

Remember Jane Daggett Dillenberger 1916-2014


Photo by David James Randolph
Jane Daggett Dillenberger taught us the love of beauty and the beauty of love and now all these lessons are required to keep the learning alive. Her legacy as our Mentor and Muse lives on in the lives she touched, the academic field she pioneered, the books she wrote, the lessons she taught in classrooms, living and dining rooms as well as museums like the Metropolitan in New York when I was her Drew University student in the 1950's. In dark moments we may recall Jane's conviction that learning is a dialogue that never ends and continue the conversation in that light.

By David James Randolph
Student, Drew University
Colleague and Friend, Graduate Theological Union








Tuesday, July 22, 2014

Voices and Votes On 2014 Midterm Elections Coming to Berkeley Fellowship Saturday October 18, 2014 2-5 pm

"They've got all the advantages of concentrated money and concentrated power. All we got on the other side is our voices and our votes, and if we get out there and make something out of them, that's how we make the difference, " says Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-MA).  

Major choices in the upcoming elections are presented by poets and artists with Open Mic and other discussion. David Madgalene, author of "Call Down the Angel" and editor of "World of Change" is MC. David Randolph, Event Host, seeks lessons to be learned from recent history with answers from Vic Sadot, Kirk Lumpkin, Susan Mashiyama, Steve Shain and others plus Open Mic participants led by Holly Harwood. Donations accepted but no one turned away for lack of funds.

Tuesday, July 1, 2014

RENEWAL OF FAITH WITH NEW MEDIA AND ANCIENT ARTS IN AMERICA AND KOREA CELEBRATED AT CONFERENCE IN BERKELEY

(Pictured from legit to right are Dr. Sam Park, Dr. Mee-Rha Hahn, Dr. David James Randolph and Dr. Byung June Hwang.

Ways of renewal of faith and preaching with new media and ancient arts were demonstrated and celebrated at the Conference on preaching held at the American Baptist Seminary of the West in Berkeley on June 26 attended by church leaders from Korea and the United States.

Keynote speaker Dr. David James Randolph said that in the 21st Century when conforming to popular cultures is leading to decay, transformation is possible no less than in the first Century when Christian faith came by preaching. The foundations of faith must be equally strong and new media and visual language are among contemporary resources which must be developed according to Dr. Randolph. He illustrated with the use of a brief movie form adaptable to YouTube.

Host Dr. Sam Park of the American Baptist Seminary of the West demonstrated how preaching can be enriched by uniting the ancient tradition of story telling in Asia with presentation using a longer movie form adaptable to chapel and classroom.

Dr. Byung June Hwang, leader of the Korean delegation, stressed the importance of new ways of communicating faith to address church decline in Korea and America with planning for the future.

Dr. Mee-Rha Hahn of Hoseo University spoke forcefully of the advantages to be gained from cross-cultural studies in theology and society. Dr. Hahn charmed the group with her graceful familiarity with a broad range of arts and science.

David Madgalene, poet, writer, artist and author of “Call Down the Angel” joined the discussion by bearing witness to the impact of poetry and the visual arts on church and society globally as represented in his anthology “World of Change.”

Dr. Nancy Hall welcomed the conference on behalf of ABSW and afterward expressed warm gratitude for the event and the hope that this be one of a series of such events and cultural exchanges.

Discussions are in fact underway to continue and expand this conference  and  related events and publications. Stay tuned to New Way Media Fest for more.


Thursday, April 10, 2014

CHILDREN OF DAWN AWAKENED BY HARPIST AT NEW WAY MEDIA FEST 2014 IN BERKELEY


Harpist Susan Mashiyama is thanked by Fest Host David Randolph after performing his work entitled "Children of the Dawn" at the New Way Media Fest 2014 at the historic Berkeley Fellowship Hall. Dr. Randolph's 80th birthday was also celebrated with highlights from the film "The Great Parade" featuring dance and choreography by Carla DeSola.


  
David Madgalene, Master of Ceremonies, announces "World of Change" to the beat of Steve Shain. This new anthology, edited by Madgalene and published by New Way Media, features the work of over 60 poets from across the San Francisco Bay Area and the world. Featured at the Festival were anthology contributors, the celebrated Clive Matson and Veteran for Peace Fred Norman. Also featuring were BFUU Poet Holly Harwood and Vic Sadot, singer-songwriter, and head of BFUU's Social Justice Committee.  



Susan Mashiyama is pictured above performing    
Children of the Dawn

David James Randolph, Text © 2012
To the tune: O WALY WALY
Thanks to Nancy E. Hall

O God, we sing our praise to you –
Our Father, Mother, Parent true.
May sisters, brothers, nations, all
Embrace Creation by your call.

We give you thanks in everything –
In summer, autumn, winter, spring.
In all our nights and all our days,
We offer you our thanks and praise.

We give you thanks for your dear son
Who offers life to everyone.
So when we drink and when we eat,
In Christ’s true presence may we meet.

Our prayers to you will never cease
Till all the world shall be at peace.
Turn us away from pride and greed
To share our wealth with those in need.

In darkest times of threat and terror,
Save us, O God, from hateful error.
May we find light and pass it on,
To be true children of the dawn.


The New Way Media Fest 2015 is scheduled for Saturday, May 16, featuring the film by Randolph and Madgalene entitled "Dinner With Jane," in honor of Jane Dillenberger. This was filmed at our first Fest in 2004 and features Doug Adams, Robert Funk, Stephen DeStaebler and contemporaries. Thanks to CARE, Center for the Arts, Religion and Education, at the Graduate Theological Union, and the Berkeley Fellowship of Unitarian Universalists, especially the Social Justice Committee. Stay tuned for news to come.

Tuesday, April 8, 2014

JESUS ENTERS SAN FRANCISCO 2014 HOLY WEEK

by David James Randolph ©

Jesus Christ enters San Francisco
riding upon…a bicycle.
He passes the reviewing stand and the Mayor
says to the City Supervisors
“I told you that bike lane was a good idea!”

Everybody is rushing to see him.
The strippers are joining with
men in their business suits to watch.
They’re stumbling out of bars
and filing out of offices.
They know something is happening.
The shopkeepers, the realtors, the restaurateurs, the waiters and witnesses
everybody except the people in the Post Office line
who are not giving up his or her place for anyone!
Some get carried away and start tearing palm branches off the trees
and throwing them in the path of Jesus
but this stops when the police ticket them for littering.
Jesus sees and laughs.
He pops a wheelie and calls out “Blessings on you!
Blessed are you when you save the trees.”

As he pops wheelies rearing up on the back wheel of the bike
he says, “Blessed are you!”
To the churches caring for the hungry and homeless
to the museums bearing witness to beauty
blessings on those caring for children
blessings on those watching out for the elderly.

But Jesus does not stay in the Bike Lane.
He pulls over to confront the merchants
selling child labor goods at high prices
and pulls down the Sale banner
“Woe unto you,” he cries.
“Woe unto you who do not pay teachers fairly
nor feed the hungry
nor house the homeless
nor support the artists.
Woe unto you who make war and not peace”
Some powerful people are scowling.
The shadows are deepening.
But Jesus just rides on through them
and as he heads out past Golden Gate Park
the fabulous sun bursts out
and fills the Pacific with golden light
and floods everything with glory.

You have this fabulous feeling of how beautiful is this place,
and how endangered it is.
How desperately each one of us must add to the beauty
and subtract from the danger
and what an honor it is to be alive
to prepare the way for Jesus Christ
to enter San Francisco.

From “On the Way After 9/11” by David James Randolph,

New Way Media, Albany, CA

Tuesday, February 18, 2014